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    We have been sent notification of a tour guide app for Hadrian’s Wall which some of you may find interesting. The app is not expensive at £1.99 and details for purchase are given below. Whether for a Battlefield Tour of the Wall or just for interest sake, this app should be quite useful and handy.







    Hadrians Wall Country - Launches
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    by  Number of Views: 111 
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    2. Fiction,
    3. Adventure/Thriller,
    4. Military
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    The book begins in 1943 with three earnest young men, each one representing the great powers of the time. An Englishman Rupert Blundell who served under Mountbatten, Captain ‘Mac’ Bundy an American and Russian Oleg Troyanovesky, each one with a military background or heritage. They have been invited to have tea with Lady Astor and entertain the young princess Elizabeth. The afternoon itself is unremarkable however on parting the three men sparked by a request of ‘no more wars’ from the Princess agree on a handshake that there should indeed be no more wars.

    After a vision on an Irish beach by a girl claimed Jesus had spoken and warned her of a great wind that would take everything. The following day 9 August 1945 a bomb was dropped on Hiroshima that would alter the course of war for the years to come.

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    by  Number of Views: 162 
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    2. Fiction,
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    This was described by Auld Yin as “quite a meaty book”. It was indeed meaty, ideal I thought for my planned rail journeys Leeds to Fort William and return. Just as the narrative concerns Edinburgh and long train journeys, so did my journey – late arrival meant a taxi was provided to replace train which we'd missed. So, I couldn't read during a dark February evening in a taxi instead of a train. As I was really getting into the book, this was a disappointment, but I caught up in climbing hut evenings, then journey through Yorkshire darkness.

    One plot spoiler that is vital for Rear Party readers to know is that Alex Morris, the woman lead, is bereaved. Her fiance Luke dies in London before the beginning of the story, which tells how Alex comes to terms with her new situation. Actually, the death is mentioned on cover, so it's not really a plot spoiler.

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    by  Number of Views: 133 
    1. Categories:
    2. Fiction,
    3. Crime,
    4. Non-Military
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    This book will stay with me for a long time; I can’t decide if that’s a good thing. It tells the story of a body being found in a small town in the south. It is a psychological drama rather than a police thriller: we don’t care who the victim is or even the killer as much as watching the events and drama unfold in the characters we learn so intimately.

    The story switches between many different perspectives which gives, overall, a very broad and detailed view of the setting. There are a few perspectives that might be called the Main Character, but I’d say it was Susanna, and she was without doubt my favourite. She is a woman disappearing in her own life: a wife, mother, daughter, sister, and teacher at the local school, but somehow she’s lost herself identity in serving others, something many women will identify with. There’s also the thirteen-year-old girl who discovers the body, the ex-pro-athlete detective, and a host of other unforgettable characters.

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    by  Number of Views: 114 
    1. Categories:
    2. Fiction,
    3. Crime,
    4. Non-Military
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    A Vish Puri Mystery


    This book was my introduction to Vish Puri, India’s Most Private Investigator, though it is the fourth book in the series. Don’t let that put you off: Hall introduces everything properly so you haven’t missed anything. This is a classic mystery book, in line with an Agatha Christie type. Vish Puri is called “the Indian Poirot” on the back cover, and I agree. He is joined by a full cast of well-rounded characters, including my personal favourite: the formidable Mummi-ji, Vish’s mother.

    The book is well-written, if not a total page-turner. The book opens following many disparate plotlines, which at first is sort of distracting, but they weave together at the end and it all makes sense. Like any good mystery, we have all the clues Vish has so we can try to solve it ourselves.

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